Greater Montreal's VitalSigns 2007
Foundation of Greater Montreal's Website
Work

The region’s unemployment rate, which has trended downward in recent years, has just recorded a sharp drop and now approaches the Canadian average, something not seen in at least two decades.

Change in the Labour Force, Employment and Unemployment, Montreal CMA
Source: Statistics Canada 1, 2
* Seasonally adjusted data for July 2007, three-month moving averages.

  • In July 2007, there were 30,200 fewer unemployed workers in the region than at the same time a year earlier. The unemployment rate declined by nearly 2 percentage points over the period, even falling below the figure for Toronto (6.7% vs. 7.0%). As a result, Montreal ranked 23rd among Canada’s 27 metropolitan regions, compared with its 26th position in 2006.2,3,4
  • Change in Unemployment Rates Montreal and Toronto CMAs
    Source: Statistics Canada 2,4
    * Seasonally adjusted data for July 2007, three-month moving averages.

  • In 2006, 51% of jobs in Greater Montreal were on the island, which also has 52% of the labour force and 53% of the total population. Some 18.6% of those jobs were part-time. 5, 6, 7
  • Between 1990 and 2005, the proportion of scientific and technical occupations in the labour force aged 25 to 64 grew faster in Greater Montreal than in Toronto and Vancouver, allowing the region to catch up (39%). 8
  • The employment rate of the region’s university graduates in 2005 was nearly 6 percentage points higher than that of the overall labour force aged 25 to 64 (80.2% vs. 74.4%). The difference was greater for women (8.3 points) than for men (3.4 points). 8
  • In 2006, the participation rate of women across the island was lower than the rate for men, as was their unemployment rate (9.5% vs. 10.5%). However, there were twice as many women in part-time jobs (26.8% vs. 13.7% for men). 9
  • In Greater Montreal, 44.7% of children under the age of 13 had access to childcare in 2006, a far higher proportion than in Toronto (13.6%), Vancouver (11.1%) or Calgary (10.3%). In 2004, 45% of families on the island with children under 5 years old benefited from childcare services at $7/day. 10, 11
  • In 2006, the unemployment rate of workers aged 25 and under in the region was 70% higher than the average for the labour force (14.3% vs. 8.4%), compared with differences of 84% for Canada as a whole and 106% for Toronto. 12,4
  • That same year, people in the 29-and-under age group on the island had higher participation rates then their elders, and their unemployment rate was also higher (12.3% vs. 9.2%). In addition, twice as many younger workers were in part-time jobs (31.5% vs. 15.4% for the 30-and-over group). 13
  • In 2001, the employment rate of Aboriginal workers aged 25 to 54 in Greater Montreal was lower than that of non-Aboriginals by 10.5 percentage points. Comparable figures for Vancouver and Toronto were 16.4 points and 7.1 points, respectively. 14
  • The median employment income of Aboriginal workers aged 15 years and over in Greater Montreal was equal to 79% that of non-Aboriginal workers in 2000. In Toronto and Vancouver, the ratios were 87% and 72%, respectively. 14
  • In 2005, as in previous years, employment earnings per capita were significantly higher in Laval ($23,480) and Longueuil ($25,501) than in Montreal ($20,610). 15
  • In 2005, among workers aged 20 and over on the island, those with lower education levels were proportionately less likely to experience stress at work (28%) than those with a postsecondary degree (40%). The same pattern could be found for long-term immigrants (29%) and Canadian-born workers (40%). 16
In 2003, the average retirement age of Quebec workers was 61.7 years. Women retired earlier than men, especially if they had a spouse. Workers in the higher income brackets retired four years earlier, on average, than those with lower incomes. 11

1 Labour Force Survey, Cansim table 282-0090 obtained from SECOR Consulting, Statistics Canada
2 Labour Force Information, Statistics Canada, August 2007
(consulted on August 14, 2007)
3 Labour force characteristics, unadjusted, by census metropolitan area (3 month moving average), Statistics Canada
(consulted on August 10, 2007)
4 Labour Force Survey, Cansim table 282-0053 and 282-0055, Statistics Canada
Taux de chômage, par région administrative, par région métropolitaine de recensement et ensemble du Québec, 1996-2006, Institut de la statistique du Québec
(consulted on August 21, 2007)
5 Nombre d'emplois, par région administrative, par région métropolitaine de recensement et ensemble du Québec, 1996-2006, Institut de la statistique du Québec
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
6 Labour force characteristics, population 15 years and older, by census metropolitan area, Statistics Canada
Labour force characteristics, population 15 years and older, by economic regions, Statistics Canada
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
7 Labour Force Survey, Cansim table 282-0053 obtained from SECOR Consulting, Statistics Canada
8 Les titulaires d’un grade universitaire et les personnes qui exercent une profession scientifique ou technique. Évolution et caractéristiques comparées de 1990 à 2005, Institut de la statistique du Québec, March 2007
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
9 Caractéristiques du marché du travail selon le sexe, région administrative de Montréal 2006, Institut de la statistique du Québec
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
10 Learning from Each Other: Early Learning and Child Care Experiences in Canadian Cities. Charts and tables, City of Toronto, June 2006
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
11 Suzanne Pion and Anne-Marie Brunelle, Regard sur les familles montréalaises, Comité famille de la Conférence régionale des élus de Montréal, January 2007
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
12 Labour Force Survey, special request, Statistics Canada
(consulted on August 21, 2007)
13 Caractéristiques du marché du travail selon l’âge, région administrative de Montréal 2006, Institut de la statistique du Québec
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
14 Andrew J. Siggner and Rosalinda Costa, Aboriginal Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas, 1981-2001, Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas, Statistics Canada, June 2005
Andrew Heisz, Canada’s Global Cities: Socio-economic Conditions in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas, Statistics Canada, July 2006
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
15 Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec, Institut de la statistique du Québec
(consulted on July 31, 2007)
16 Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes (ESCC 2005), Statistique Canada, compilation by the Direction de santé publique de Montréal
(consulted on July 31, 2007)